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Archive for April, 2012

Paradigm Shift: the Open (and Online) Education Revolution

April 19, 2012 Leave a comment


Coursera
is an online university started by two Stanford alumni that aims to bring classes from elite universities to students around the world for free. Partner universities include Stanford, Princeton, the University of Michigan, and the University of Pennsylvania. NPR has an article on its history and Silicon Valley’s current fascination with education. Also, the New York Times has a piece on the influx of investments for Coursera and similar systems by venture capitalists.

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The Minerva University is an ambitious project, aiming to be an online university that can compare and compete with Harvard and other Ivy League schools. Slated to open in 2014, they are accepting applications for teaching positions as well as signing up prospective students.

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No less ambitious than Coursera and Minerva, Udacity was founded by three roboticists (two of whom work at Google and are Stanford professors) who were inspired by Khan Academy and wanted to do the same with college-level education. Udacity started with two courses, Building a Search Engine (taught by Google employees!) using JavaScript and Introduction to Robotics, and courses are being added as instructors and material become available.

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Codecademy
is the most different of these virtual schools. Codecademy is not really a "university" – its sole purpose is to teach you how to code. Also, while they all offer course materials in multiple media, Codecademy teaches you by letting you do all the work. It is simple, straightforward, and easy.

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The Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s MITx, for which the maiden course is called "Circuits & Electronics 6.002x ." Described as "an experimental on-line adaptation of MIT’s first undergraduate analog design course: 6.002. This course will run, free of charge, for students worldwide from March 5, 2012 through June 8, 2012." Prerequisites are a high barrier though, as students are required to have taken an AP level physics course in electricity and magnetism as well as be adept at basic calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations.

ComputerWorld has a fascinating article rounding up some of these online education shakers.

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Learn ya some!

April 18, 2012 Leave a comment

Coursera is an online university started by two Stanford alumni that aims to bring classes from elite universities to students around the world for free. Partner universities include Stanford, Princeton, the University of Michigan, and the University of Pennsylvania. NPR has an article on its history and Silicon Valley’s current fascination with education.

The Minerva University is an ambitious project, aiming to be an online university that can compete and compare with Harvard and other Ivy League schools. Slated to open in 2014, they are accepting applications for teaching positions as well as signing up prospective students.

No less ambitious than Coursera and Minerva, Udacity was founded by three roboticists (two of whom work at Google and taught at Stanford) who were inspired by Khan Academy and wanted to do the same with college-level education. Udacity started with two courses, Building a Search Engine (taught by Google employees!) using JavaScript and Introduction to Robotics, and courses are being added as instructors and material are available.

Codecademy is the most different of these virtual institutions. Codecademy is not really a “university” – its sole purpose is to teach you how to code. Also, while they all offer course materials in multiple media, Codecademy teaches you by letting you do all the work. It is simple, straightforward, and easy.

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BBC Languages

April 18, 2012 Leave a comment

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Watch live! A polar bear in Denmark; a 142,000 gallon aquarium off the coast of Catalina Island; or moon jellyfish in Vancouver!

April 18, 2012 Leave a comment

Take your class to the Scandinavia Wildlife Park in Denmark, and watch Siku – LIVE!

http://explore.org/#!/live-cams/player/siku-cam-1

AND

See all the fish and other marine life in a 142,000 gallon, three-story high Aquarium of the Pacific off the coast of Catalina Island in Long Beach, California!

http://explore.org/#!/live-cams/player/aquarium-pacific-live-cam-2

OR

Look at moon jellies in the Vancouver Aquarium!

http://explore.org/#!/live-cams/player/jellyfish-cam

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Differentiated Instruction, Study Island, and Improving Student Achievement

April 17, 2012 Leave a comment

I came across an interesting article from THE Journal that began with a discourse: moving teachers from teaching to facilitating. Here is the most compelling part for me:

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1,000 Educational Apps for iPad — Organized!

April 17, 2012 Leave a comment

The iTunes App Store serves up almost a million apps (if not more than by the time you read this), and thousands of those can be used in educational settings. However, searching for apps that you can use in your classroom is harder than finding a semicolon in a program’s source code. Enter the Texas Computer Education Association, or TCEA. They maintain a list of apps they have tested and recommend for use in the classroom in a Google Docs spreadsheet.


Edudemic, an instructional technology blog, took this document and listed interactive books to give you an idea of how exhaustive TCEA’s list. You may read it at <a href="http://edudemic.com/2012/02/1000-apps.http://edudemic.com/2012/02/1000-apps.</a>

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Programming project comes to UK primary schools (BBC Article)

April 17, 2012 Leave a comment

Programming project comes to primary schools (BBC Article)

Volunteers have kicked off a project to set up after school clubs that teach young children how to programme (sic) computers.

Called Code Clubs , the sessions will aim to instil (sic) the basics of computer programming into children aged 10-11.

The clubs will be built around practical hands-on tasks that will include children making games and eventually controlling robots.

It aims to have 25% of the UK’s primary schools running a Code Club by 2014.

(Read the rest of the article here .)

Retrieved from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-17740143

Visit Code Club’s site: http://www.codeclub.org.uk

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